This is an introductory college course that will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret US government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute US government and politics. (College Board Course Description, 2014)

This course introduces students to the principles that underlie American Government and politics as well as the rights and responsibilities of US citizens.  The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government and to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable, and engaged citizens.


This course introduces students to the principles that underlie American Government and politics as well as the rights and responsibilities of US citizens.  The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government and to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable, and engaged citizens.

Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society’s unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

This course is intended to open the student’s mind to the global community; its successes and failures; and the US’ role in this community. Further, it is designed to encourage debate and discussion of the important global issues of our time.
This course is intended to open the student’s mind to the global community; its successes and failures; and the US’ role in this community. Further, it is designed to encourage debate and discussion of the important global issues of our time.

The course studies both the principles and applications of basic psychology. Beginning with study of human development, students will consider the development of personality, learning, thinking and motivation and emotions, treating personality disturbances, social interaction, stress, careers in psychology and research in psychology. The course is recommended for those interested in behavioral science.


This course will provide an introduction to the concepts and principles of Sociology. The basic social units of society and how they interact are studied in order to understand and appreciate the contributions of Sociology to the field of social behavior. Social changes and its causes and effects will also be addressed during the semester.


The focus of this course is the study of the historical development of American ideas and institutions. This course will focus on the economic, political and social changes that have shaped Americans as a people. Students will obtain a basic knowledge of American culture through a survey of US History.  Students go beyond a general understanding of history and use analysis skills to explore events, peoples, and ideas in American history. Students will write critical essays, complete background reading outside of class, and be participatory in class discussions.

This course is designed to help students develop an appreciation of humankind’s past and of its role in creating modern civilization. This course centers on the political and industrial revolutions, and the modern era, including imperialism, world wars, and the development of the current international landscape. The overall goal of the course is to provide students with solid understanding of the problems, changes, developments and conflicts that have shaped our modern world society so that they are better able to understand and respond to those that occur in their lifetimes.

  • This course is designed to help students develop an appreciation of humankind’s past and of its role in creating modern civilization. Following introductory units, the course will center on medieval times, the Renaissance, the age of revolutions, including both political and industrial revolutions, and the modern era, including imperialism, world wars, and the development of the current international landscape. The overall goal of the course is to provide students with solid understanding of the problems, changes, developments and conflicts that have shaped our modern world society so that they are better able to understand and respond to those that occur in their lifetimes